Tips on Daily Management of Fibromyalgia

Manage My Pain App

An app created by founder and CEO of ManagingLife Tahir Janmohamed, called Manage My Pain is getting noticed. Not only is it the most downloaded app on Android and award winning, but the reviews are quite high with an average of 4.1 out of 5 stars for its free version and 4.3 out of 5 stars for its paid version.

This app offers chronic pain suffers a way to electronically capture their day-to-day pain in one program that is compatible with cloud and any Android device and then the patient can look up easy to read reports for him/herself and the doctor.

This app can replace all the hard copy tracking you have in a pain diary, journal, log, and/or tracker for any sufferer of chronic pain, especially ones suffering from arthritis, cancer, chronic muscular pain, migraines, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue, so you and your doctor have a better sense of your condition.

Both the main site (http://www.managinglife.com) and the Google app store (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lcs.mmp.lite) have a video to further explain this wonderful app. It is available in a free and paid version.

Pain is considered chronic if it lasts for 6 months or longer and the free version of this allows you to add 10 records of data for your doctor. This makes it a great free app because after your initial consultation, you will at the very least a week and a half of data to share for your next visit.

However, if you'd rather share more data with your doctor, the paid version, which is priced at $3.99, will allow you to store an unlimited amount. This would be a good option for patients that only see their doctor monthly.

I like what this app has to offer, even though, I personally do not have it. It is not yet available for the iPhone, but I've been in contact with Tahir Janmohamed and will try and pin down the launch date for us Apple users and then announce it here.

Stay fabulous!
Love and friendship,

Kimberley



Appreciation





I just came across this statement this morning and I find it to ring very true in my own life, but it may not be for the reasons as you see it. This entry today may sound more like a rant as opposed to my other entries, but it's nothing more than me standing up for what I believe we Fibromites should all have in our lives.

Relationships are truly important. You have family relationships, friendships, partnerships, working relationships, and the list goes on of important people in your life.

In today's society it seems we have many, many people that think our time means very little. I've personally spent countless hours driving all over New England for middle school band concerts, middle school basketball games and tournaments, school projects, school functions, and the like. Each one of these things had a person in charge who expected many, many hours of dedication from my child with little regard to the parent who had to supply the ride, time, and money to pay these people for such an event.

When you work at a job in today's society, many of the bosses seem to feel that if you are getting paid, you should be available on call for whenever they need you instead of working a set schedule.  My husband and I have both worked for places that expected 18 hours/day of work 5-6 days a week and did not provide us with maids or landscapers for our homes that we neglected for them to have a body at their establishment so they could (in my case) get their nails done.

Doctors and specialists in today's society will make you wait hours in a waiting room even when you have a scheduled appointment. Why is that happening? They certainly charge me and my insurance company an awful lot for 5 minutes of service!

There's an old saying that states, "Time is money". Well if time truly is money, then please explain to me why I'm at the mercy of someone else's time if I'm the one providing the money? And if I provide services, why do I have to wait to get paid from someone on their time?

We now live in a society that does not make any sense because many, many people forgot how to respect one another. I've spent years trying to do things expected of me out of the respect I was taught to provide and I've paid the price of that in Fibromyalgia pain. And is that fair if I'm the one paying for something mentally, physically, AND financially? I think not!

My take on this statement is very different from most because I truly feel people need to learn the term respect in today's day and age:

It's not often I come across a saying like this particular one that fits. Yes, relationships work both ways, and effort should be made, but when a person in your life clearly does not understand you, it is not your fault, nor should you be hearing the statement "relationships work both ways" from someone who is incapable of empathy, compassion, and understanding. Effort should be determined on a person's capacity to love and not on the capability of measured time (as in getting together). Some of the best relationships I've had are from people who barely know me and some of the worst relationships I've had are from those who have taken advantage of my loving nature because they claim to know me. It's about time that people value and appreciate what they have-- including the love that has been freely given to them by others. We shouldn't look for or expect anything more.

We Fibromites take a beating from people who lack respect, and on May 12, we should all take back some power through awareness, the power of respect!

Stay fabulous!
Love and friendship,

Kimberley

Thoughts on Housework and Fibromyalgia

I've given housework a lot of thought over the years. When I was in my twenties, I used to feel guilty in the wee hours of the morning about not getting the entire house clean daily. It would keep me up until I'd finally break down at 4 AM and I'd start to dust and vacuum. Seriously-- no joke! 

In my thirties I thought I got things down to a science. I was home all day and I'd clean like a mad woman until my husband came home. Of course, I'd still feel guilty that not everything got done and I vowed to get up at 5 AM every morning to at least start a load of laundry and clean the dishes from all the midnight snacking. I reserved my urge to vacuum until 9 AM because at that time we were in an condo-like apartment complex and I didn't want to wake the family below me. I learned from the days of the high rise apartment in my twenties. ;) 

Today though in my forties, and now having a decade of fibro experiences, I think MUCH differently. A clean house is a group effort-- period. If you are the only one in the group that puts in the effort on a daily basis, the house won't ever be to your standards. 

I have finally come to terms with the fact that my house will never, not ever, be as clean as I'd like. Kids will be kids and husbands will be husbands. Having said that, that DOES NOT mean that I don't strive for a clean house. Quite the contrary! 

I have a schedule for every day of the week and I stick to certain rooms and certain activities each day. For instance, if I'm supposed to vacuum-- that is what I do. I DO NOT bother putting my children's toys away in that room. 

I grab a bag or a bucket and put all of the crap I find on the floor in that bag/bucket and give it to the kids to deal with. I have also been known to do the same to my husband too. ;) 



Now, I can't speak for all of you, but I think part of my problem was I used to do it all because it was expected that I did. Maybe that expectation isn't reaching consciousness with the people I live with-- BUT that doesn't mean it isn't there when half the room is filled with toys, shoes, and snack clutter that was obviously not all of my doing. 

Yes, I used to be on top of all of those things! I did the housework of five people before I got sick-- probably just like all of you-- but really should I have had to do that? The answer is a resounding no! My kids and husband are older and they are wiser too. ;)  That means they can all pitch in every now and again so I can do what I should have done in the first place, the work of one. And I can now FINALLY say, I'm content with that!

Stay fabulous!
Love and friendship,

Kimberley

Housework, Fibromyalgia, and the Flu Season

Having the flu, a sinus infection, stomach bug, or a cold is hard for anyone, but it's even harder on someone with Fibro. I can't speak for the entire Fibromyalgia community, but for me, if I'm not careful, my colds could very easily turn into pneumonia because I refuse to take the time I need to rest.

All mothers with kids will at one point in life hear their own mother in the back of their mind telling them to clean all of the sheets and house with bleach from top to bottom if the kids get sick. I'm not sure about any of you, but my mother suffered from OCD and a can of Lysol was her best friend. There was never any other scent in our house but Fresh Linen when I was growing up LOL!

This type of thinking may have been great for the Baby Boom Generation. They (pardon the pun) bought into all the products that promised to kill every germ in sight. I honestly think my mother may have thought it would ward of the boys too. LOL! That generation needed quick fixes because both parents worked and that was a great thing for them.  It did the trick.

HOWEVER, I believed it worked for a completely different reason than what was thought. That generation was the first generation to grow up with in an advanced world. And that has perks. They had new things to combat colds.

The prior generation that raised the Boomers, utilized the environment they lived in. Things like vinegar and baking soda were used in place of bleach. All three of those products work to kill germs, but how they were used was very different.

My grandparents didn't spend as much time cleaning the house as my parents did. They didn't because they knew that the human body needs some germs around to build up an immunity. In essence, many of our parents didn't have a lot of colds because they had a carefully built up immunity to them. That immunity was built from their very first days out of the womb. They were breast fed, ate foods fresh from the garden (yup, Organic isn't new), and had a few germs around the house to help build up their systems.

When I grew up, I grew up in a sterile environment. As soon as I had my first sneeze, out came the Lysol. And then my Mom cleaned and scrubbed everything. I was sick ALL the time. At one point in the fourth grade I was sick for a month and the doctor wasn't even sure what I had because my coughing, sneezing, aching, and fever just wouldn't go away.

Now that I have kids and Fibro, I have to be a little more creative when it comes to cleaning the house when the Flu Season rears its ugly head. I can't be as diligent as my mother was, nor do I even have the strength to scrub. My Fibro has robbed me of my strength and  even if I try, I'll either wind up with a flare, or worse. So what do I do?

Simple, that's what I do. I go back to the simpler times when bleach wasn't around. Yes, I adopted all the things my Grandmother did to clean the house. When we are sick, I will open a window to let the bad air out and the good air in. I also will boil a pot of water to get moister in the air. And lastly, I cut up an onion. The onion will not only help you breathe a little better, but it will take the germs out of the air, as well. And you know what? My kids aren't as sick as I used to be growing up!

So the next time you hear that the old way isn't the best, do yourself a favor and just don't listen! The old way WAS the best way for not only combating germs, but also to help you maintain your health in other ways. Some tricks helped you save time! Cutting up an onion was one of those tricks!

If you slice an onion and leave the cut part exposed it will absorb the germs. Once it turns black, dispose of it, and replace it with another if you need to. This may sound like a lazy way of doing things, but it really helps you when you need your rest just as much as your kids!

Stay fabulous!
Love and friendship,

Kimberley
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